Back

How to reply to emails on your mobile

If you are reading this, chances are that you own a smartphone or tablet. It is estimated that 51% of all emails are now read on mobile devices. However, email etiquette often gets forgotten when it comes to sending/replying to emails on mobiles.

So, what can you do differently? Check out these following tips and improve your mobile email etiquette.

Set auto textCraft some automated text that will appear at the end of each email you send. Once it is set, you won’t have to worry about it again.

Set precondition text – This is a variation of auto text, but the text appears at the beginning of a message instead. This would be something like “Sent from my mobile so sorry if the reply is brief.” This prepares a recipient for any typos, predictive text errors or layout issues.

Mobile to mobile emails – If you know that the recipient will answer your email on a mobile device, make sure that your email is written accordingly. A mobile device has a smaller screen, so your message should be short, straight to the point and have an simple, yet effective subject line. Also, don’t send large attachments.

Predictive text – It is always best to turn predictive text off when messaging someone else. This avoids any embarrassing errors that could make you look foolish.

Don’t come across as rude – Your email should be short and precise, but that can make you appear very terse in your responses. Do a quick review before you send your email to make sure that you are striking the right tone.

Abbreviations – If used correctly, abbreviations can be a great tool and can save valuable time. However, never overdo them as it can make messages difficult to read. Also, don’t say things like ‘LOL‘!

How will the email be interpreted? – Before you send your email, take a step back and consider how the recipient will interpret your message. Will they get what you are trying to say or could the message get lost in translation?

Avoid humor –  Using smiley’s or jokes in email can be risky. Special characters might not always appear on a recipient’s mobile screen and humor is often subjective. What you find funny might be deeply offensive to someone else. The best course of action is to simply avoid using humor altogether.

If it’s not important, don’t add it – Only ever send what is required. Don’t add items like fancy graphics and imagery that have nothing to do with what you are trying to say. You don’t want to make the email too difficult to read.

Send from a computer if you have doubts – Most people find it easier to write emails when sat at a computer, especially if it requires a level of thought. If you have any doubts, don’t send the email via your mobile and wait.