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Don’t send large or confidential files via email

Employees use email to send and receive all forms of messages and files. However, it actually is not suitable for all types of corporate communications. Here are some reasons why you should ensure your employees do not send large or confidential files as email attachments:

Email is not completely secure

Any email can be intercepted so any confidential information sent through unencrypted email can be exposed. Set out strict guidelines as to which documents can be sent via email and which need to be sent via more secure routes. Also, you shouldn’t set individual passwords on confidential files due to password management issues for the sender and recipient.

Large files won’t be delivered

Many email servers have a limit on files sizes like 10MB. A delivery will fail if an attachment is too large, often without the sender knowing. Sometimes delivery notifications can take days to reach the sender, which could mean important deadlines are missed.

Large attachments cause network lag

Large attachments often cause mail server delays for both parties which reduces speed and capacity. Not all companies have the fastest networks available so this has to be considered when sending attachments.

No control over attachments

Once an email has been sent, the sender has no control over the attachment. This means that the attachment can’t be expired or the the number of downloads can’t be limited.

Unreliable delivery receipts

Even though email users often request delivery and read receipts, these often get blocked by mail servers, email clients and recipients. Just because the sender receives a delivery receipt, there is no way to verify that the intended recipient has opened the email or attachment.

When it comes to sending email attachments, if they are of a large size, consider alternatives in order to increase security and delivery times.